Call for Papers 2021 – Online (English)

The deadline for Replaying Japan 2021 – the 9th International Japan Game Studies Conference is
March 31st, 2021


Replaying Japan 2021: The 9th International Japan Game Studies Conference


Conference theme: Artificial Intelligence in Japanese Games

Date: August 9-13, 2021

Location: Hosted Online by the University of Alberta

Proposals in Japanese are most welcome! 日本語での発表要旨も受け付けます。

Call for Papers

Since 2012, when we held the first meeting in Edmonton, the Replaying Japan conference has hosted researchers from various fields conducting research on Japanese game culture. The ninth international conference is also our 10th anniversary meeting. We are returning virtually to the University of Alberta 10 years after we first met for an online conference. We celebrate the rich and international research community that has evolved over the decade.

Replaying Japan 2021 is being organized by a partnership of the AI for Society (AI4S) signature area, the Prince Takamado Japan Centre (PTJC), and the Kule Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS) at the University of Alberta.  It is organized in collaboration with the Ritsumeikan Center for Game Studies, the University of Delaware, Bath Spa University, Seijoh University, University of Liège, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and DiGRA Japan.

This year’s conference theme will be “Artificial Intelligence in Japanese Game Culture”. Particular attention will therefore be paid to how AI is represented in Japanese games, the evolution of game AIs, and how big data analytics have changed the game industry.

Proposals that address artificial intelligence in Japanese game culture are thus encouraged, but other topics are also welcome. This conference focuses broadly on Japanese game culture, education, and industry. It aims to bring education, and the Japanese game industry from the perspectives of humanities, social sciences, business, or education. We encourage poster/demonstration proposals of games or interactive projects related to these themes.

Submission Guidelines

Abstracts must be submitted to replayingjapan@gmail.com as a MS Word Document. The abstract should be no more than 500 words. Figures, tables and references do not count toward the word limit.

The deadline for submitting to Replaying Japan 2021 is March 31st, 2021.

Notification of Acceptance: May, 2021

As the conference is being held online we will be following a compressed presentation format where presentations are short to leave time for questions.

  1. Each session will be 30 minutes and will have a chair.
  2. We will ask that full papers/posters/demos to be uploaded a week before the conference to a conference website. 
  3. During the online sessions, presenters will not present their papers. Instead they will be given a few minutes to summarize their work.
  4. There will be a respondent who will comment briefly on the papers/posters/demos and ask the first questions.
  5. We will take written questions from the online chat.
  6. Sessions will be in English, but we will have translation support for presenters who are not comfortable with English.
  7. For work in progress there will be a special Lightning Talks session.

All papers must be original. The following paper categories are welcome:

  • Full papers (500 words): If accepted you will be expected to post a draft paper (around 3,000 words) or a video presentation (up to 20 minutes) a week before the conference. The paper can be in English or Japanese, but must have an English abstract.
  • Posters/demos (500 words): Presenters who want to demonstrate innovative work best shown visually rather than submit a written paper should take advantage of our poster/demo sessions. If accepted you will be expected to submit a poster OR a short video of no more than 5 minutes a week before. Again, there will be an online session where you can talk to your poster/demo.
  • Lightning Talks (300 words): If you have work in progress that you would like to present we will have a Lightning Talk format. If accepted you will be expected to post a short video a week before and to submit a single PowerPoint slide. We will have a session when each Lightning Talk presenter will get 1 minute to talk to their slide.

Figures, tables and references do not count toward the word limit. It is understood that by submitting to Replaying Japan 2021 you assert that the work is original and that there are no copyright issues. You also agree to let the University of Alberta post you work and archive the conference proceedings/video/draft papers. 

Proposals in Japanese are most welcome! 日本語の発表要旨はrcgs[a]st.ritsumei.ac.jpにご送付ください。詳しくはRCGSのウェブサイトをご覧ください

Note that we plan to have support for Japanese speakers for whom presenting in English is difficult. We will have workshops in Japanese for graduate students on preparing for presentations at international conferences. We will also have translation support during the conference to help with presentations and questions. 

Announcing: The Prince Takamado Japan Centre will also be awarding two essay prizes (1500 words) to the best student presentations on Japanese games. These will have a value of $500 CAD each.

Contact Information

For more information see www.replaying.jp or contact replayingjapan@gmail.com

You can follow us on Twitter at #replayingjapan

Call for Papers 2021 – オンライン (日本語)

下記のとおり、2021年のReplaying Japanの発表を募集いたします。みなさま、是非ご応募いただけましたら幸いです。

日時 2021年8月9日~13日

場所 オンライン

主催 The University of Alberta

共催 立命館大学ゲーム研究センター、University of Delaware、Bath Spa University、星城大学、Université de Liège、日本デジタルゲーム学会(DiGRA JAPAN)

後援 AI4Society of the University of Alberta, The Prince Takamado Japan Centre, Kule Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Alberta.

【発表募集】

Replaying Japanは、2012年より、日本のゲーム文化を研究している様々な分野の研究者が参加する会議として開かれてきました。第9回目となるこの国際会議は、2012年にカナダのエドモントンで前身となるシンポジウムが開かれてから10年たち、再びアルバータ大学に戻ってきた10周年記念大会でもあります。この10年、進化し続けてきた豊かで国際的な研究コミュニティを讃える機会にもなるでしょう。

Replaying Japan 2021はオンライン会議となります。アルバータ大学AI for Society、The Prince Takamado Japan Centre、アルバータ大学Kule Institute for Advanced Studyのパートナーシップによって企画されています。また、立命館ゲーム研究センター、デラウェア大学、バース・スパ大学、星城大学、リエージュ大学、日本デジタルゲーム学会との共同開催になります。

今回のテーマは「日本のゲーム文化における人工知能 Artificial Intelligence in Japanese Game Culture」です。特に、特に、日本のゲームの中で人工知能がどのように表現されているのか、ゲームAIの進化、ビッグデータ分析がゲーム業界をどのように変えたのかに注目した大会となります。

日本のゲーム文化における人工知能をテーマにした提案も歓迎しますが、もちろん、それ以外のテーマも歓迎します。Replaying Japanでは、日本のゲーム文化、教育、産業を幅広く取り上げています。各国の研究者、学生、クリエイターが一堂に会し、発表と交流を図ることを目的としています。

そこで、ゲーム、ゲーム文化、テレビゲームと教育、日本のゲーム産業に関連するその他のテーマについても、人文・社会科学、ビジネス、教育の観点からの論文を募集します。

これらのテーマに関連したゲームやインタラクティブなプロジェクトのポスターやデモンストレーションの提案も募集します。

【発表環境】

Replaying Japan 2021はオンラインで開催されるため、ショートプレゼンテーション形式を採用し、質疑応答のための時間を長くとります。

  1. 各セッションは30分で、司会者がつきます。
  2. 論文、ポスター、デモは、Replaying Japan2021の1週間前までにカンファレンスウェブサイトにアップロードしていただきます。
  3. オンラインセッションでは、発表者は論文を発表しません。その代わりに、発表者には数分間の要約報告の時間が与えられます。
  4. コメンテーター(respondent)が論文、ポスター、デモについて簡単なコメントをし、最初の質問をします。
  5. オンラインチャットからの質問も受け付けます。
  6. セッションは英語で行われますが、英語が苦手な発表者のために翻訳サポートがあります。
  7. 進行中の研究については、特別にライトニングトークセッションを行います。

(DiGRA Japanの大会でおなじみの形式です)

【発表種別】

すべての論文はオリジナルである必要があります。論文のカテゴリーは以下の通りです。

  • フルペーパー(英文要約500 語)。採択された場合は、会議の 1 週間前に論文の草稿を投稿していただきます。論文は日本語でも英語でも可ですが、必ず英語の要約を添付してください。
  • ポスター/デモ(英文要約500 語)。書面での発表よりも、視覚的に革新的な研究成果をアピールしたい方は、ポスター/デモセッションをご利用ください。採択された場合は、1週間前にポスターまたは5分以内の短いビデオを提出していただくことになります。オンラインセッションでは、ポスター/デモを見ながら話をすることができます。
  • ライトニングトーク(英文要約300語)。発表したい進行中の作品・研究がある場合は、ライトニングトーク形式で発表します。採択された場合は、1週間前に短いビデオを投稿していただき、1枚のパワーポイントスライドを提出していただきます。

各ライトニングトークのプレゼンターが自分のスライドの話をするために1分が与えられます。

図、表、参考文献は、単語の制限に向かってカウントされません。Replaying Japan 2021に投稿することで、あなたはその作品がオリジナルであり、著作権の問題がないことを保証することになります。また、アルバータ大学があなたの発表について投稿し、大会の予稿、ビデオ、ドラフトを保存することにも同意するものとします。

英語での発表が困難な日本語話者へのサポートを予定しています。大学院生を対象に、国際会議での発表準備のための日本語ワークショップを開催します。また、学会期間中には翻訳サポートを行い、発表や質問のサポートを行います。

【告知】The Prince Takamado Japan Centreは、日本のゲームに関する学生の発表の中で、優れた発表を二件選び、エッセイ賞を授与することになりました。エッセイ賞は1500ワードが目安となります。また、エッセイ賞には500カナダドルが付与されます。

 

日本語で応募される際は上記とは手順が異なります。下記の概要をご覧ください。

本学会での発表をご希望の方は、以下の形式で発表要旨を作成し、rcgs [ at ] st.ritsumei.ac.jpにご送付ください。

【要旨言語】 日本語(発表タイトルは投稿時から英語訳を入れて応募してください)

【要旨締め切り】 2021年3月31日

【採択通知】 2021年5月

【要旨字数】

フルペーパー 1000文字以内(図表を含まず)。図表は2ページ目以降に置く。

デモ・ポスター 1000文字以内(図表を含まず)。図表は2ページ目以降に置く。

 ライトニングトーク 600文字以内(図表を含まず)。図表は2ページ目以降に置く。

【保存ファイル形式】 PDFフォーマット

 

注意事項 採択された場合、英文要旨の提出を追ってお願いします。また、発表は英語でおこなっていただきます(英語での発表およびQ&Aについてサポートが必要な方は、採択後にご相談ください。ワークショップや翻訳サポートもご活用ください)。

 

発表要旨を投稿する際には、以下の点にご留意ください。

発表要旨のPDFには、本文と図表を入力し、氏名・所属等、著者を特定できる情報を記載しないでください。送付する際のメール本文には下記の内容を記載してください。

タイトル:

報告者名:

所属:

住所:

Emailアドレス:

 

本学会での発表の可否は、プログラム委員会での審査後、2021年5月以降にお知らせいたします。なお、ご不明な点や質問がございましたら、rcgs [ at ] st.ritsumei.ac.jp までお寄せ下さい。 皆様の積極的な投稿をお待ちしております。

 

英語でのご投稿を検討されている方は、replaying.jpの英語版CFPをあわせてご確認ください。

Keynotes 2020


Hirokazu Hamamura (浜村 弘一)


Hirokazu Hamamura (浜村 弘一) is a Senior Advisor at Kadokawa Digital Entertainment and Vice President of the Japan E-Sports Union. He was born in Osaka in 1961 and Graduated at the Wasada University. He has been involved in the “Famitsu Weekly” game magazine since the first issue, in 1986 (at that time, “Famicom Tsūshin”). He was the editor-in-chief   of “Famitsu Weekly” editor-in-chief and  then President and CEO of Enterbrain Inc. After having served as a director of KADOKAWA, he is currently a senior advisor in charge of digital entertainment for the company. In addition, as a representative of the Famitsu Group, he analyzes trends in the game industry from various angles and writes columns. As a Vice President of the Japan E-Sports Union (JeSU), since January 2018, he is actively working to promote the esports industry in Japan and further grow and develop it. He also wrote the book Play games only – Games to play when raising a 12-year-old boy (『ゲームばっかりしてなさい。-12歳の息子を育ててくれたゲームたち-』) among others.


Susana Tosca


Susana Tosca is Associate Professor at the Department of Communication and Humanities at Roskilde University, Denmark. For the last 20 years, she has researched and published widely on the areas of digital culture, storytelling, computer games and transmediality. She is a co-founder of the journal Gamestudies and author of the books Literatura Digital (UNEX, 2003), Transmedial Worlds in Everyday Life (Routledge, 2019) and Understanding Videogames (Routledge 2008, 2012, 2015 and 2019), just released in its 4th edition.

Mediating the Promised Gameland

This lecture will take you on a trip to Japan as the promised gameland, a place of pilgrimage for gamers from all around the world, as seen through the lens of travel videoguides made by amateur commentators. The guides are paratexts that mediate game culture and breed spectacular expectations, promising to transform their audience from outsiders into insiders and assist them in their travels, be their real or imaginary. The lecture will be articulated around Tosca´s theoretical framework of transmedial experience and desire, to map how the immaterial pleasures of gaming get materialized into places, objects, bodies and events to be experienced and consumed. Besides building upon previous work in the field of game studies and Japanese popular culture, Tosca will draw on literature from audience and tourism studies, with concepts such as spectacle, ritual, or pilgrimage. Her methods include the analysis of a YouTube video corpus in English, Spanish, French and Danish and its commentary, autoethnographic material from her own fieldwork in Japan, as well as a series of short interviews with non-Japanese game visitors and would-be visitors.


Florent Gorges


Florent Gorges is the President of Omake Books Editions (France) and the co-founder of Pix’n Love Editions; he is a specialist in the history of Nintendo as well as a TV presenter, a translator and interpreter, a biographer of game developers and an author of documentaries about Japanese games

The first steps of Japanese esport

Competition has always been at the heart of gameplay in most video games. It is therefore hardly surprising that the first players sought to foster competition by organizing tournaments, meetings, and initiatives that today are considered as “first steps” in the history of esport. This paper will focus on these first attempts at “contests” and on the beginnings of esport in the early days of Japanese video games.

Call for Papers 2020 – Liège

The deadline for Replaying Japan 2020 – the 8th International Japan Game Studies Conference – has been postponed to March 13th!


Replaying Japan 2020: The 8th International Japan Game Studies Conference


Conference theme: “Ludolympics 2020”

Date: August 10-12, 2020

Location: University of Liège (7 Place du 20-Août, 4000 Liège, Belgium)

Proposals in Japanese are most welcome! 日本語での発表要旨も受け付けます。

Call for Papers

Since 2012, the Replaying Japan conference has hosted researchers from various fields conducting research on Japanese game culture. The eighth conference is being organized by the Liège Game Lab (a research group specialized in the study of video games as a cultural objects in French-speaking Belgium) in collaboration with the Ritsumeikan Center for Game Studies, the University of Alberta, the University of Delaware, Bath Spa University, Seijoh University and DiGRA Japan.

This year’s conference theme will be “Ludolympics 2020”. Particular attention will therefore be paid to the relationship between games and sport in Japan, to the Japanese esport scene and its cultural specificities (see Goto-Jones, 2016; Harper, 2014) and to competitive video game practices (Taylor, 2012 ; Hamari & Sjöblom, 2017 ; Witkowski, 2012 ; Besombes, 2016), but also, more generally, to the notion of video game performance and to the mediatization or spectacularization of this performance.

Through the prism of this theme, fundamental aspects of games and play will be questioned: the physicality of the playing practices, the place of competition in Japanese game culture, the role of rules and conventions in games and play (Salen and Zimmerman, 2004), as well as the possibilities of bypassing these rules (through cheating, for instance; Consalvo, 2009) or the spaces of appropriation that they allow (visible in the amateur practices, fan creations or doujin circles, among others).

Furthermore, esports are a common and robust entry point into the study of Japanese video games, their surrounding industry, their history, structuring, cultural variants (through the multiplicity of competitive game scenes, for example), and their surrounding economy. Competitive gaming has been an important vector for players’ professionalization and has led to the emergence of new figures in game culture: pro-players, commentators, streamers, video makers, speedrunners, specialized journalists, etc.

Beyond video game practices in the strict sense, the conference will thus focus on the different forms of mediatization of these practices inside and outside Japan. How are game performances commented, represented, transformed into spectacles? What media formats and discourses are being invented to promote them? What “paraludic” cultural practices are developing around these scenes and communities?

Lastly, the inclusion of (competitive) play in society and the many societal issues it raises must be questioned: the issue of the (in)accessibility of games (especially in the competitive field), the minority representation in this domain or the political tensions it harbors are topics that also deserve further attention.

Proposals that address these different issues are thus welcome, but these should not be understood in a restrictive sense. This conference focuses broadly on Japanese game culture, education, and industry. It aims to bring together a wide range of researchers and creators from many different countries to present and exchange their work. We therefore also invite papers on other topics relating to games, game culture, video games and education, and the Japanese game industry from the perspectives of humanities, social sciences, business, or education. We encourage poster/demonstration proposals of games or interactive projects related to these themes.

 


Submission Guidelines


Abstracts must be submitted through the platform EasyChair, following this link: <https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=rj2020>

The deadline for Replaying Japan 2020 has been postponed: March 13, 2020

Notification of Acceptance: April, 2020

All papers must be original. The following paper categories are welcome:

  • Full papers, posters/demos and short papers: please send anonymized abstracts (pdf) of no more than 500 words in English or Japanese
  • Panels: panel proposals should have a maximum length of 1500 words, including a description of each presentation and a short biography of each participant; they can be submitted in English or Japanese

Figures, tables and references do not count toward the word limit.

Proposals in Japanese are most welcome! 日本語の発表要旨はrcgs[a]st.ritsumei.ac.jpにご送付ください。詳しくはRCGSのウェブサイトをご覧ください

 


Contact Information


Fanny Barnabé <fanny.barnabe@uliege.be>

@LiegeGameLab

#replayingjapan

 


Works cited


Besombes N. (2016), Sport électronique, agressivité motrice et sociabilités, Doctoral thesis in Sports Sciences, Sorbonne Paris-Cité-University, France

Consalvo M. (2009), Cheating. Gaining Advantage in Videogames, Cambridge, MIT Press

Goto-Jones C. (2016), The Virtual Ninja Manifesto: Fighting Games, Martial Arts, and Gamic Orientalism, Lanham, Rowman & Littlefield

Hamari J. and Sjöblom M. (2017), “What is eSports and why do people watch it?”, Internet research, vol. 27, n° 2, pp. 211-232

Harper T. (2014), The Culture of Digital Fighting Games: Performance and Practice, New York, Routledge

Salen K. and Zimmerman E. (2004), Rules of Play. Game Design Fundamentals, Cambridge, MIT Press

Taylor T.L. (2012), Raising the Stakes: E-Sports and the Professionalization of Computer Gaming. Cambridge, The MIT Press

Witkowski E. (2012), “On the Digital Playing Field How We ‘Do Sport’ with Networked Computer Games”, Games and Culture, vol. 7, n° 5, pp. 349-374